pendant mes moments de loisir

A picture blog dedicated to the art of vintage and historic photography.

I urge followers and re-bloggers to not only look, but to research and read the history of these photos and photographers. You will learn a lot from them.

Ask or Submit
Sources

  1. Self portrait for French VoguePhotograph by Sylvie Guillem, February 2004

    Self portrait for French Vogue
    Photograph by Sylvie Guillem, February 2004

    Notes: 37

  2. "Self-Portrait"Photograph by Peter Keetman, 1962

    "Self-Portrait"
    Photograph by Peter Keetman, 1962

    Notes: 8

  3. nevver:

Self-portraitSally Mann, 1974

    nevver:

    Self-portrait
    Sally Mann, 1974

    Notes: 924

    Reblogged from: nevver
  4. coolchicksfromhistory:

“Portrait of the Photographer,” manipulated self-portrait by Gertrude Käsebier, circa 1899.
Although she became one of the most influential turn of the century American photographers, Gertrude Käsebier did not begin her career as a photographer until her late 30s.  At 37, she enrolled at the Pratt Institute to study painting and drawing, but she was quickly drawn to photography.  Ten years after she began her artistic studies, Alfred Stieglitz proclaimed her the leading artistic portrait photographer of the day.  
A mother of three, Gertrude was influenced by educationalist Friedrich Fröbel who developed the concept of kindergarten.   The bond between mother and child became a reoccurring theme in Gertrude’s work.  She preferred to photograph mothers in the act of mothering- rocking a baby, helping a child out the door, nursing, reading a story.  Some of her mother and child photographs have titles such as “Blessed art thou among women” which connect the Virgin Mary to mothers of the day.
Gertrude is also known for her photographs of Native Americans working at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, but her best known image to modern audiences is probably her portrait of Evelyn Nesbitt.
An advocate for female photographers, Gertrude helped to establish the Women’s Professional Photographers Association of America.  Photographer Frances Benjamin Johnson was among her admirers and friends.  

    coolchicksfromhistory:

    “Portrait of the Photographer,” manipulated self-portrait by Gertrude Käsebier, circa 1899.

    Although she became one of the most influential turn of the century American photographers, Gertrude Käsebier did not begin her career as a photographer until her late 30s.  At 37, she enrolled at the Pratt Institute to study painting and drawing, but she was quickly drawn to photography.  Ten years after she began her artistic studies, Alfred Stieglitz proclaimed her the leading artistic portrait photographer of the day

    A mother of three, Gertrude was influenced by educationalist Friedrich Fröbel who developed the concept of kindergarten.   The bond between mother and child became a reoccurring theme in Gertrude’s work.  She preferred to photograph mothers in the act of mothering- rocking a baby, helping a child out the door, nursing, reading a story.  Some of her mother and child photographs have titles such as “Blessed art thou among women” which connect the Virgin Mary to mothers of the day.

    Gertrude is also known for her photographs of Native Americans working at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, but her best known image to modern audiences is probably her portrait of Evelyn Nesbitt.

    An advocate for female photographers, Gertrude helped to establish the Women’s Professional Photographers Association of America.  Photographer Frances Benjamin Johnson was among her admirers and friends.  

    Notes: 104

    Reblogged from: coolchicksfromhistory
  5. Robert Cornelius self-portrait, Philadelphia, 1839

    Robert Cornelius self-portrait, Philadelphia, 1839

    Notes: 24